OECD — OECD Watch

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) was established in 1961. Today, the OECD is a forum of 34 industrialised countries that develops and promotes economic and social policies. Its mission is to ‘build strong economies in its member countries, improve efficiency, home market systems, expand free trade, and contribute to development in industrialised as well as developing countries’. Simply stated, the OECD acts on behalf of and in collaboration with its member governments to promote free market policies and trade.
— Read on www.oecdwatch.org/oecd-guidelines/oecd

It is later than you think

It Is Later Than You Think
BY ROBERT W. SERVICE

Lone amid the café’s cheer,
Sad of heart am I to-night;
Dolefully I drink my beer,
But no single line I write.
There’s the wretched rent to pay,
Yet I glower at pen and ink:
Oh, inspire me, Muse, I pray,
It is later than you think!

Hello! there’s a pregnant phrase.
Bravo! let me write it down;
Hold it with a hopeful gaze,
Gauge it with a fretful frown;
Tune it to my lyric lyre …
Ah! upon starvation’s brink,
How the words are dark and dire:
It is later than you think.

Weigh them well …. Behold yon band,
Students drinking by the door,
Madly merry, bock in hand,
Saucers stacked to mark their score.
Get you gone, you jolly scamps;
Let your parting glasses clink;
Seek your long neglected lamps:
It is later than you think.

Look again: yon dainty blonde,
All allure and golden grace,
Oh so willing to respond
Should you turn a smiling face.
Play your part, poor pretty doll;
Feast and frolic, pose and prink;
There’s the Morgue to end it all,
And it’s later than you think.

Yon’s a playwright — mark his face,
Puffed and purple, tense and tired;
Pasha-like he holds his place,
Hated, envied and admired.
How you gobble life, my friend;
Wine, and woman soft and pink!
Well, each tether has its end:
Sir, it’s later than you think.

See yon living scarecrow pass
With a wild and wolfish stare
At each empty absinthe glass,
As if he saw Heaven there.
Poor damned wretch, to end your pain
There is still the Greater Drink.
Yonder waits the sanguine Seine …
It is later than you think.

Lastly, you who read; aye, you
Who this very line may scan:
Think of all you planned to do …
Have you done the best you can?
See! the tavern lights are low;
Black’s the night, and how you shrink!
God! and is it time to go?
Ah! the clock is always slow;
It is later than you think;
Sadly later than you think;
Far, far later than you think.

Fact Affliction: John Train’s True Remarkable Obsession – The Washington Post

I purchased a copy of “Remarkable Names of Real People” from Blackwell’s, whilst in my first year at Christ Church, a little over forty years ago now. I was therefore delighted to chance upon this article in the Washington Post, which explains its genesis. Who could not take pleasure in the giddying abundance of improbable names? Life is a constant source of paronomasia and nomenclatural delight. 

Melissy Dalciny Caldony Yankee Pankee Devil-Take-The-Irishman Garrison. QED. Amen LJ

Fact Affliction: John Train’s True Remarkable Obsession – The Washington Post

 

Lo scherzo di Ronaldo: spunta alle spalle del giornalista e gli fa il verso Lo scherzo di Ronaldo: spunta alle spalle del giornalista e gli fa il verso – La Stampa

Ma chi se ne frega? LJ

Enrico Zambruno è “vittima” di Cristiano Ronaldo, che spunta alle sue spalle e gli fa il verso. «Non mi ero accorto di nulla !» ha scritto il giornalista su Instagram, dove ha pubblicato il video dello scherzo dell’attaccante juventino, che nel giro di pochi minuti è diventato virale. (Instagram @enricozambruno )
— Read on www.lastampa.it/2018/09/14/sport/lo-scherzo-di-ronaldo-spunta-alle-spalle-del-giornalista-e-gli-fa-il-verso-oY5nkOudwyipQN6AukVbSK/pagina.html

Así se regula en el mundo el uso de móviles en el aula

Intervention in this area seems wise, for the deleterious impact of social media on the development of young people is troubling, not least because of the speed at which opinion becomes mob opinion. Adults behave no better than teenagers in respect of this. Smartphones have already been banned from schools in France; I’d like to see the same thing happen in the UK. LJ

Source: 20 Minutos Así se regula en el mundo el uso de móviles en el aula

 

Paul McCartney zag God toen hij high was | Show | AD.nl

Paul McCartney believes in a higher being. Fine.
Paul McCartney believes he has met this higher being. Not fine.

Paul McCartney, who now claims to have met God whilst under the influence of a narcotic drug, is an ocean-going turnip.

One of my tutors, Christopher Robinson, in his work on French Literature of the 19th Century, refers in his consideration of Flaubert’s Félicité, protagonist of “Un coeur simple”, the first of the “Trois Contes”, to her state of “transcendent self-deception” at the moment of incommunicable “revelation” when the Logos becomes fused and confused, deep within the self, with her recollected image of her beloved parrot. Look no further. Paul McCartney has demonstrated the enduring veracity of the notion. If this isn’t “transcendent self-deception”, then I don’t know what is. To communicate this during a period of our history when narcotics constitute such a grave problem, for more than one generation, is an act of egregious irresponsibility. Perhaps he isn’t feeling the eyes of the world upon him. Perhaps he is looking for love, which is apparently “all you need”. Perhaps it is indeed time, after all, for him to sink into oblivion. LJ

Voormalige Beatle Paul McCartney gelooft in een hoger wezen. Hij heeft naar eigen zeggen God ontmoet na drugsgebruik. Dat zei de 76-jarige componist en zanger tegen de Engelse krant The Times.

Source: Paul McCartney zag God toen hij high was | Show | AD.nl

 

Children will be banned from buying energy drinks under plans announced by Theresa May to tackle disruptive behaviour in classrooms.

This gesture of commitment to the welfare of young people might look a little more convincing if it were set within the context of a broader coherent policy of protective intervention, extending to such areas as the restriction of sales of smartphones for use by minors. The implementation of a policy excluding them from schools (the smartphones, not the minors, at least not yet…), such as that already courageously set in place in France, might entail tangible benefits. Certain schools (I am sure this is not true for all) also appear to have thrown in the towel with regard to responsible regulation of the sale of junk food and drinks, the battle against the dominion of social media and instruction in what constitutes basic good sense. Young people deserve more confident guidance than this and adults should have the courage to provide it. LJ

The Daily Telegraph: Energy drinks ban for children to tackle disruptive behaviour in class